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Mark Seliger heads up McDonald’s portrait project


February 2019 issue News

Is McDonald’s the tie that binds? Editorial and portrait photographer Mark Seliger created a documentary-style portrait series for the restaurant chain that highlights both the diversity and the commonality of the restaurant’s patrons.The idea for the series evolved during a brainstorming session between Seliger and ad agency We Are Unlimited. “We put out there this idea that everybody has something in common,” he says, “and the idea that you can go into a McDonald’s and there’s... Continue Reading >

Why Tony Hewitt’s photography business thrives on diversification


February 2019 issue Profiles

"It’s fair to say that I’m not someone who likes to sit still.”Anyone who’s met Tony Hewitt wouldn’t argue that. An Australian Institute of Professional Photography Grand Master of Photography, Hewitt is former Australian Photographer of the Year with a resume full of accolades. The Perth, Australia-based photographer started out in weddings, covering about 1,000 of them before evolving more into portrait work, then commercial photography, then fine art, landscape, and aerial... Continue Reading >

At the precipice: Jay Philbrick’s cliffside wedding portraits


February 2019 issue Profiles

“What about the Eaglet?” the message read. Immediately Jay Philbrick knew what his friend was proposing.Most of Philbrick’s dramatic cliff portraits are set on New Hampshire’s Cathedral Ledge, a rock-faced cliff where subjects are lowered down to an outcrop by rope—no climbing skills required. But this friend was suggesting a portrait atop the Eaglet, a narrow rock spire that can be summited only by an experienced climber.© Philbrick PhotographyWas Philbrick up for it? Of... Continue Reading >

3 lessons in building a successful photography business


December 2018 issue Profiles

Jenn Lewis © Jenn LewisJenn Lewis has walked in the shoes of a struggling entrepreneur. Like many of the photographers she teaches, she’s made the mistake of undervaluing her work. She pushed through one challenge after another by trial and error until she discovered what works. Now running a thriving senior studio in Clemmons, North Carolina, she wants to help other photographers sidestep the hurdles she faced.Eleven years into her work as a photographer, Lewis has a solid business... Continue Reading >

John Gress’ best portrait lighting techniques


December 2018 issue Profiles

Ask John Gress what he does for a living, and he’ll tell you he lights things. The whole truth is more detailed: a career spanning two decades of photojournalism, commercial photography, portraiture, videography, and more. Along the way, he’s become one of  the nation’s foremost experts on lighting, with an emphasis on using artificial light and light modifiers to enhance reality—natural light, only better.© John GressIn the run-up to his presentation at Imaging USA in January... Continue Reading >

Saying thanks with portrait donations


November 2018 issue News

Gratitude for a life-saving rescueOn Jan. 17, my 13-year-old daughter Jolie didn’t come home.© Rogier van BakelEarlier in the day, she and her best friend, Julia, had been ice-skating on a nearby lake on Mount Desert Island, Maine, home to Acadia National Park. By 5 p.m., it was snowing, night had fallen, and I was frantic with worry. Julia’s mom and I determined that the girls had gone snowmobiling with Eli, Julia’s dad. There wasn’t a trace of them other than Ski-Doo... Continue Reading >

Jason and JoAnne Marino discuss in-person sales

9.25.2018 Business

How'd you like to grow your business 400 to 500 percent? Jason and JoAnne Marino of Imagine Photography made it happen by switching to in-person sales. Here's what they say about in-person sales, print products, and their move from wedding to portrait photography. RELATED: Learn more about the Marinos' in-person sales journey Continue Reading >

Keith Barraclough: Portrait whisperer


October 2018 issue Profiles

Keith Barraclough’s most challenging recent session? One hundred sixty portraits of 80 employees in eight hours. It took mental preparation, admits New York-based Barraclough of the corporate job. “You really are a conveyor belt.” Shooting with an assistant, he had roughly one minute with each subject and just seconds between them. As one subject moved over to the computer to check out their portraits, Barraclough was photographing the next. “You have to know that you aren’t... Continue Reading >
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