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Tribute to American portrait photography


April 2019 issue News

© Judy HostExhibition considers portraits past and presentMore than 40 photographers’ works were hung for the exhibition “Portraits Americana: A Brief Survey of American Portrait Photography.” The show honoring American portrait photography was curated by Glenn Rand for the Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art in St. Joseph, Missouri.The exhibition, which ran from November 2018 through January 2019, included portraits by renowned photographers Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, and Gordon... Continue Reading >

Tawny Chatmon finds fulfillment in driving cultural change


April 2019 issue Profiles

Change Agent“My heart wasn’t in it anymore.” That’s how Tawny Chatmon remembers feeling about her commercial photography career after her father died. Sitting in her spacious studio, the basement  of her Upper Marlboro, Maryland, home, she chokes back a tear as she remembers the self-selected assignment that changed her life.“After my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer, he and my mother moved in with us here while he was being treated. I decided to chronicle his treatment... Continue Reading >

John and Coleen Graybill revisit an ancestor’s passion project


April 2019 issue Profiles

Mary Lou Slaughter was a schoolgirl in Seattle when her teacher mentioned a photograph of Mary Lou and her Native American grandmother that was displayed at the county fair. Learning of her heritage, classmates of Mary Lou subjected her to name-calling, spittle, and bullying for being a “dirty old Indian.” Slaughter shunned her heritage until, at 50, she witnessed her son’s talent for wood carving. Embracing her indigenous background, Slaughter became a master basket weaver. Now 80 years... Continue Reading >

Capture your subject’s true colors


2.13.2019 News

1. Understand your subjectMaking good portraits relies heavily on photographers' personal perceptions and judgements, neither of which is related to the technical aspects of photography. Good portraiture is a display of who the subject believes himself or herself to be as well as an interpretive expression of who the photographer believes the subject to be.Sometimes these perceptions can end up on the opposite side of the spectrum. This is why it's important to get to know a subject before... Continue Reading >

Mark Seliger heads up McDonald’s portrait project


February 2019 issue News

Is McDonald’s the tie that binds? Editorial and portrait photographer Mark Seliger created a documentary-style portrait series for the restaurant chain that highlights both the diversity and the commonality of the restaurant’s patrons.The idea for the series evolved during a brainstorming session between Seliger and ad agency We Are Unlimited. “We put out there this idea that everybody has something in common,” he says, “and the idea that you can go into a McDonald’s and there’s... Continue Reading >

Why Tony Hewitt’s photography business thrives on diversification


February 2019 issue Profiles

"It’s fair to say that I’m not someone who likes to sit still.”Anyone who’s met Tony Hewitt wouldn’t argue that. An Australian Institute of Professional Photography Grand Master of Photography, Hewitt is former Australian Photographer of the Year with a resume full of accolades. The Perth, Australia-based photographer started out in weddings, covering about 1,000 of them before evolving more into portrait work, then commercial photography, then fine art, landscape, and aerial... Continue Reading >

At the precipice: Jay Philbrick’s cliffside wedding portraits


February 2019 issue Profiles

“What about the Eaglet?” the message read. Immediately Jay Philbrick knew what his friend was proposing.Most of Philbrick’s dramatic cliff portraits are set on New Hampshire’s Cathedral Ledge, a rock-faced cliff where subjects are lowered down to an outcrop by rope—no climbing skills required. But this friend was suggesting a portrait atop the Eaglet, a narrow rock spire that can be summited only by an experienced climber.© Philbrick PhotographyWas Philbrick up for it? Of... Continue Reading >
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