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Tawny Chatmon finds fulfillment in driving cultural change


April 2019 issue Profiles

Change Agent“My heart wasn’t in it anymore.” That’s how Tawny Chatmon remembers feeling about her commercial photography career after her father died. Sitting in her spacious studio, the basement  of her Upper Marlboro, Maryland, home, she chokes back a tear as she remembers the self-selected assignment that changed her life.“After my father was diagnosed with prostate cancer, he and my mother moved in with us here while he was being treated. I decided to chronicle his treatment... Continue Reading >

John and Coleen Graybill revisit an ancestor’s passion project


April 2019 issue Profiles

Mary Lou Slaughter was a schoolgirl in Seattle when her teacher mentioned a photograph of Mary Lou and her Native American grandmother that was displayed at the county fair. Learning of her heritage, classmates of Mary Lou subjected her to name-calling, spittle, and bullying for being a “dirty old Indian.” Slaughter shunned her heritage until, at 50, she witnessed her son’s talent for wood carving. Embracing her indigenous background, Slaughter became a master basket weaver. Now 80 years... Continue Reading >

Pete McBride’s epic photographic journeys


December 2018 issue Profiles

Documenting the Colorado River and the Grand CanyonLike most people who grew up in the Western United States, native Coloradan Pete McBride is acutely aware of water. From Colorado to California, life and lifestyle have been shaped by this ever-diminishing resource that provides the lifeblood to communities carved out of the desert, nourishment for farms bullied up from the arid ground, and catalyst for legal disputes between cities, states, and nations. Yet water remains something most... Continue Reading >

Photo series captures beauty of fragments


11.25.2018 News

The secret to Kristen Meyer’s graphically pleasing work? “I am really meticulous,” she says. “Many of my pictures could come together much quicker, but I spend a great deal of time refining the details.” To establish clean lines, she often draws a light pencil guideline, which she later erases. She and her husband, Colin, work together on the images: She styles the look, he shoots with a Nikon D700, and they both edit. They prefer natural light, occasionally with fill, and use... Continue Reading >

Mirrored: Photo series reveals contrasting views


11.25.2018 News

“No cheating,” says Sebastian Magnani of his series “Reflections,” in which the same round mirror is positioned in various environments to reflect different views. What was reflected in real life is what was captured in the photo, he notes—no editing. “I was many times overwhelmed,” he says.INSPIRATION: The concept for the series sprang to mind when Magnani’s girlfriend was holding a mirror. “I was so impressed by the big contrast between the reflecting light (the sky from... Continue Reading >

Science experiments lead to artful photographs


November 2018 issue News

Kaleidoscopes of form and colorEpsom salt, acetaminophen, vitamin supplements: It’s hard to believe these common drug store supplies are the subjects of Justin Zoll’s vibrant microscopy series.“I’ve always been very interested in science,” says Zoll, who often did experiments with a friend who owned a microscope. One day the pair connected Zoll’s DSLR to the microscope, and Zoll liked the result. He purchased his own microscope through eBay and began experimenting with... Continue Reading >

Saying thanks with portrait donations


November 2018 issue News

Gratitude for a life-saving rescueOn Jan. 17, my 13-year-old daughter Jolie didn’t come home.© Rogier van BakelEarlier in the day, she and her best friend, Julia, had been ice-skating on a nearby lake on Mount Desert Island, Maine, home to Acadia National Park. By 5 p.m., it was snowing, night had fallen, and I was frantic with worry. Julia’s mom and I determined that the girls had gone snowmobiling with Eli, Julia’s dad. There wasn’t a trace of them other than Ski-Doo... Continue Reading >

Keith Barraclough: Portrait whisperer


October 2018 issue Profiles

Keith Barraclough’s most challenging recent session? One hundred sixty portraits of 80 employees in eight hours. It took mental preparation, admits New York-based Barraclough of the corporate job. “You really are a conveyor belt.” Shooting with an assistant, he had roughly one minute with each subject and just seconds between them. As one subject moved over to the computer to check out their portraits, Barraclough was photographing the next. “You have to know that you aren’t... Continue Reading >
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