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Whale photographs with emotional impact


December 2017 issue News

© Scott Portelli Photographer Jem Cresswell at workThe humpback whale’s brain contains three times the spindle cells as the human brain, says Jem Cresswell, whose series “Giants” documents the gentle mammals. “In humans, spindle cells are linked to cognitive skills, empathy, social organization, and rapid gut reactions,” he says. No one can say whether these cells do the same for whales. But “having spent a lot of time around them, it’s very obvious to me how emotional they... Continue Reading >

Safari photography tips


August 2017 issue News

David Yarrow is king of the wireless triggerScotland-born fine art photographer David Yarrow is known for creating stunning wildlife portraits, many of which are taken from a unique point of view. His latest coffee-table book, “Wild Encounters,” includes many of his frame-filled portraits of elephants, lions, and rhinos shot from the ground up. How does he get these unique captures that set him apart from the competition?While Yarrow admits to having put himself in harm’s way to get... Continue Reading >

Wildlife photography from the ground up


August 2017 issue Profiles

David Yarrow is perspiring. It’s another sweltering 90-plus degree day in Kenya’s Amboseli National Park and the arid climate is sapping his energy and his patience. The park’s name means “place of dust” and it comprises 150-square miles of flat, largely featureless land on the border of Kenya and Tanzania. Yarrow has come with the hope of photographing lions and perhaps elephants, as he has done many times before. However, during his several days here, wildlife sightings have been... Continue Reading >

Bird by bird: 5 tips for the avian photographer


June 2017 issue Business

Joe Campanellie's Journey into the Fine Art of birds My interest in avian photography was sparked accidentally. It was never my intention for it to become a body of work that would define me. In the beginning my goal was simply to take my camera out for a few long walks to decompress and renew the passion I’d lost for my life’s work. In the end it led to that and so much more. The passion was indeed rekindled and my spirit renewed.But as with anything in life that’s worth achieving,... Continue Reading >

Jay Dickman’s movable feast


May 2017 issue Profiles

DEVOURING the world with his lensJay Dickman’s credentials are impeccable: a Pulitzer Prize, iconic pop music images, nearly 30 years with National Geographic, more than 40 National Geographic Expeditions, and his own highly touted FirstLight Workshops. Yet his most recent kudos is more comprehensive of the man: Travel and Leisure named him among “10 Fascinating People You Can Travel With in 2017.” He opines that the magazine might have run out of subjects after coming up with nine, but... Continue Reading >

Ian Plant blazes his own trail in landscape and nature photography


April 2017 issue Profiles

"It wasn’t a mutiny,” says landscape and nature photographer Ian Plant, “but it was close to one.” He was leading a nature photography workshop in Wyoming’s Grand Teton National Park when he explained to his attendees that they wouldn’t be going to Schwabacher Landing, the site where Ansel Adams made his famed “The Tetons and the Snake River” photograph in 1942. Instead, they would be going to a nearby and equally dramatic site.“They weren’t happy,” remembers Plant.... Continue Reading >

Wild thing: Photographing captive animals in studio


April 2016 issue News

The unlikely portrait subjectBrad Wilson’s portrait sessions with captive animals are as unpredictable as the subjects. After securing permission to photograph an animal, Wilson rents a studio or sound stage near the zoo or sanctuary where the animal resides, pays trainers to accompany the animal, and then gives the animal free reign. “The animals are effectively loose in the studio and are not trained in the traditional sense,” he says. “They’re habituated to humans and human... Continue Reading >
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